Google Doodle Celebrating Today, Hedwig Kohn's 132nd Birthday

Hedwig Kohn, a pioneer in physics and one of the only three women who received Habilitation in physics before World War II. Hedwig Kohn was among the physicists, who was forced to leave Germany during the Nazi regime. Today's search giant Google remembers Hedwig Kohn by dedicating a colorful doodle on her 132nd Birthday. Google Doodle Celebrating Today, Hedwig Kohn's 132nd Birthday.

Google Doodle Celebrating Today, Hedwig Kohn's 132nd Birthday



Hedwig Kohn was born in Breslau, Province of Silesia. Hedwig Father Georg Kohn was a wholesale merchant of fine cloth. Hedwig entered the university in Breslau in 1907 as the second woman in the Physics Department and later she obtained his doctorate in Physics under Otto Lummer in 1913 and was soon appointed as Lummer's assistant. She stayed at the university's Physics Institute during World War I and obtained her Habilitation in 1930.

Hedwig Kohn was dismissed from his position in 1933, due to Nazi regulations which prohibited Jews from Government service.

Hedwig Kohn under Lummer guidance in the quantitative determination of the intensity of light, both from broad-band sources, such as a "black body", and from the discrete lines of atoms and molecules. She wrote 270 pages in the leading physics text of the 1930s and 1940s in Germany, received one, and wrote numerous articles in scientific journals, some of which were still being cited in the 1980s. Two of his students became professors in Germany.

Hedwig Kohn's 132nd Birthday, Google Doodle Celebrating Today

Hedwig Kohn's 132nd Birthday, Google Doodle Celebrating Today

Taking us inside Hedwig Kohn's lab, today's Doodle by Hamburg-based guest artist Carolin Löbbert celebrates the life and science of the pioneering physicist. After earning her doctorate in 1913, Kohn went on to become one of only three women certified to teach at a German university before World War II.



As a Jewish woman living in Nazi Germany, Kohn was barred from her teaching position in 1933. She spent many years completing research contracts in industrial physics before fleeing to the US in 1940. There, she returned to herf passion, teaching at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina and Wellesley College in Massachusetts until 1952. After retiring from the classroom, Kohn took over a research associate position at Duke. In the sub-basement of the school's physics building, where her lab was located, she directed Ph.D students in their research while continuing her own work in flame spectronomy-something she started in 1912.

Over the years, Kohn's work resulted in more than 20 publications, one patent, and hundreds of textbook pages that used to radiate the field of radiometry (a set of techniques meant to measure electromagnetic radiation, including visible light) well in the 1960s

Happy 132nd birthday, Hedwig Kohn!

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